Astrona is an online collection of artists resources and developers who specialise in space and astronomical art, science fiction art, visions of future worlds, design and visualization of technologies for living in space, space exploration, spaceships, starships, space colonies, etc. Take a journey through amazing images! Content periodically updated as new material becomes available. Contact Astrona.
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Thursday, September 21, 2006

Warhammer Digital Paintings

The Reich calls you! Sci-Fi, Futuristic, etc... Digital artist on DeviantART by the name of Mikkow and his gallery at DeviantART.

Note: All artwork and images are copyrighted. Please do not use images without the permission of the artist.

Mikkow Digital Paintings: The Reich calls you!
Mikkow Digital Paintings: The Reich calls you!
Mikkow Digital Paintings: The Reich calls you!

Saturday, September 16, 2006

Apollo 9 Art by Russell Arasmith

Beautiful drawings by artist Russell Arasmith. These were used by NASA to illustrate the Apollo 9 Mission.

Note: All artwork and images copyright © Russell Arasmith. Please do not use images without the permission.

Apollo 9 Art by Russell Arasmith
Apollo 9 Art by Russell Arasmith
Apollo 9 Art by Russell Arasmith
Apollo 9 Art by Russell Arasmith
Apollo 9 Art by Russell Arasmith


Source: Apollo Mission Control Photo Plus

Gallery: Apollo 9 Art by Russell Arasmith

Ed Hengeveld Space Art

Ed Hengeveld Space Art Ed Hengeveld is a space flight historian who lives with his wife and son in the Netherlands, where he works for Dutch television news. He has written numerous articles for magazines such as Spaceflight and Quest, as well as for various Dutch magazines. His interest in space flight began with the Apollo-8 mission around the moon in 1968 and has grown ever since. In 1981 he was at the Kennedy Space Centre to witness the launch of STS-1 and he was also present at the Dryden Flight Research Centre when Columbia landed there two days later. While at Dryden, he also met various people involved in the X-15 and lifting body programs, resulting in a special interest in this area of flight research. Ed is a member of the British Interplanetary Society. In his spare time he enjoys painting, especially scenes from the Apollo program. His paintings have been published in various magazines around the world and his portrait of the twelve moon-walking astronauts ("Moonwalkers") earned him praise from Apollo-12 lunar module pilot Al Bean, who is himself an artist. Moonwalkers is now an official NASA photograph assigned NASA No. S95-14663. Ed's wonderful detail and vantage point perspectives gives us outstanding views of familiar images.

Link: Ed Hengeveld Art Gallery

Well, how a guy from the Netherlands became an historian U.S. space flights?

Friday, September 15, 2006

Space Colonies & Starships

Space ColoniesTechnology and engineering discussion of possible space colonies designs. Space colonies, spaceships, design and technology for living in space, etc.

Sources:

NASA and SSI of O'Neill Bernal Sphere design

NASA Stanford Torus design

NASA and SSI of Island Three paired cylinder design

A few illustrations - not the NASA ones

Starships and Space Colonies

Below are a few examples. You can click on images for a much larger version.

Stanford Torus


The Stanford Torus was the principal design considered by the 1975 NASA Summer Study, which was conducted in conjunction with Stanford University (and published as Space Settlements: A Design Study, NASA Publication SP-413). It consists of a torus or donut-shaped ring that is one mile in diameter, rotates once per minute to provide Earth-normal gravity on the inside of the outer ring, and which can house 10,000 people.

Space Colonies - Stanford TorusStanford Torus external view. The overhead mirror brings sunlight into the colony through a series of louvred mirrors on the inner ring. Painting by Don Davis courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Stanford TorusStanford Torus cutaway view. The rotation of the torus provides Earth-normal gravity on the inside. Painting by Rick Guidice courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Stanford TorusStanford Torus interior. It seems unlikely that early colonies will have a population density this low. Painting by Don Davis courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Stanford TorusStanford Torus agriculture, conducted on multiple tiers for efficient use of space. Agriculture in space can be very productive because of the controlled environment. Painting courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Stanford TorusStanford Torus construction. Depicted is the final stages of installation of the radiation shielding. Painting by Don Davis courtesy of NASA.

Source: Stanford Torus

Bernal Sphere


The Bernal Sphere design is very similar to that used in the science fiction series Babylon 5, although the original Bernal Sphere design is much smaller, only 1 mile in circumference, and can house 10,000 people.

Space Colonies - Bernal SphereBernal Sphere external view. It was later learned that the mirrors won't work properly in this configuration and will need to be redesigned. Painting by Rick Guidice courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Bernal SphereBernal Sphere cutaway view. The sphere rotates twice per minute to provide Earth-normal gravity on the inside. Painting by Rick Guidice courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Bernal SphereBernal Sphere agricultural rings seen in cross-section. Farming occurs in the upper layers, and animal husbandry in the lower layers where gravity is a little stronger. Painting by Rick Guidice courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Bernal SphereBernal Sphere interior, complete with California-style wine and cheese party, and human powered flight in the lower-gravity area near the axis. Painting by Rick Guidice courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Bernal SphereBernal Sphere hub still in the construction phase, with shielding and mirrors being installed. Painting by Don Davis courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - Bernal SphereBernal Sphere low-gravity recreation area at dusk, protected by netting. Gravity becomes lower as you approach the center, and at the very top are the zero-gravity honeymoon suites. Painting by Don Davis courtesy of L5 News and National Space Society.

Source: Bernal Sphere

O'Neill Cylinder


The O'Neill Cylinder, designed by Princeton physicist Gerard K. O'Neill, is considerably larger than the other two designs, and is referred to as an "Island 3" or 3rd-generation space colony. The configuration consists of a pair of cylinders, each 20 miles long and 4 miles in diameter. Each cylinder has three land areas alternating with three windows, and three mirrors that open and close to form a day-night cycle inside. The total land area inside a pair of cylinders is about 500 square miles and can house several million people. The cylinders are always in pairs which rotate in opposite directions, cancelling out any gyroscopic effect that would otherwise make it difficult to keep them aimed toward the sun.

Space Colonies - O Neill CylinderO'Neill Cylinder exterior. The modules on the large ring structure around the endcap are used for agriculture. Each module could have differing environments ideal for a particular set of food items. Painting by Rick Guidice courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - O Neill CylinderO'Neill Cylinder interior provides a 20-mile vista. Children born here would think it totally normal to have "upside down" land areas overhead. Painting by Rick Guidice courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - O Neill CylinderA dramatic side view of an O'Neill Cylinder showing a cloud level forming at an altitude of 3000 feet. Painting copyright by Don Davis courtesy of the artist.

Space Colonies - O Neill CylinderO'Neill Cylinder endcap. The artist's inspiration came after O'Neill suggested to him that the view of San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge from Sausalito would provide an excellent scale reference for a later model cylindrical colony. Painting by Don Davis courtesy of NASA.

Space Colonies - O Neill CylinderO'Neill Cylinder vista with ruddy hues caused by a fairly rare solar eclipse. The cylinders are large enough to have weather, which could even be made to change with the seasons, perhaps depending on a colonist vote. Painting by Don Davis courtesy of NASA.

Source: O'Neill Cylinder

The Space Settlement Art Gallery

Space Settlement: The Concept for Colonization Beyond the Earth

Space Settlement is the concept for colonization beyond the Earth. While most thinking regarding the expansion of the human race outward into space has focused on the colonization of the surfaces of other planets, the space settlement concept suggests that planetary surfaces may not be the best location for extraterrestrial colonies. Artificial, closed-ecology habitats in free orbit would seem to have many advantages over any planetary home.

The Space Colony Art Gallery

Mike Combs' Space Settlement Page

NASA Space Colony Art from the 1970s

Space and Astronomical Art Journal: NASA Space Colony Art
In the 1970's Princeton physicist Gerard O'Neill with the help of NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University showed that we can build giant orbiting spaceships and live in them. A couple of space colony summer studies were conducted at NASA Ames in the 1970s. Colonies housing about 10,000 people were designed. A number of artistic renderings of the concepts were made. These have been converted to jpegs and are available as thumbnails, quarter page, full screen and publication quality images.

Great cylindrical utopias. At some times these might have seemed remotely feasible...

Link: Space Colony Art from the 1970s

Gerard K. O'Neill: Space Colonies: The High Frontier

Wikipedia: Gerard K. O'Neill

Thursday, September 14, 2006

Terry L. Sunday Digital Space Art

Artist says: "Space art," sometimes called "Astronomical Art," has a long and respectable history. Artists have been creating imaginative works showing conceptual and fanciful spacecraft, strange new worlds and awesome galactic vistas since long before the first primitive artificial satellites were boosted into earth orbit. Until the advent of the computer, space artists relied on traditional media, such as oil paints on canvas or acrylics on illustration board, to show us their visions. Today’s powerful desktop computers provide an optional medium. The images on this Digital Space Art website show some of the capabilities of affordable three-dimensional (3D) modeling and rendering software as used to create photo-realistic images of space subjects. The hardware models in these images--spacecraft, booster rockets, interplanetary probes, and so on--are realistic extrapolations of designs not so very different from vehicles that actually flew. You won’t find any physically unlikely "fantasy" spacecraft here. Most of these images feature the hardware in a prominent role-they’re not just extraterrestrial scenery.

Here just a few of the works that available for viewing on his website.

Note: All artwork and images copyright © Terry L. Sunday. Please do not use images without the permission of the artist.

Terry Sunday Digital Space Art
Terry Sunday Digital Space Art
Terry Sunday Digital Space Art


Link: Terry L. Sunday Digital Space Art

Wednesday, September 13, 2006

How Man Will Explore the Moon

Mechanix Illustrated: How We Will Explore The Moon

How We Will Explore The Moon (Mechanix Illustrated. Jun, 1959): Earthmen who land on the moon will need a special lunar vehicle for exploration. The vehicle must be self-sustaining and capable of traversing both the smooth, dust-paved crater beds and climbing the steep rocky passes of their mountainous rims...

Scans: How We Will Explore The Moon

Moon Farms

Mechanix Illustrated: Moon Farms to Banish Starvation

Moon Farms to Banish Starvation (Mechanix Illustrated. May, 1954): Fifty years from now much of the world's food may be grown high in the sky! Tomorrow’s farmers may raise their crops on artificial "moons" that have been launched into space and move in orbits around the earth. And the successful agriculturalist will probably be a combination chemist, biologist and engineer...

Scans: Moon Farms to Banish Starvation

Space Ark

Here is the megaproject a Space Ark in style Noah-technology. Noah is back! He knows how to keep us, and will tell us what to do... Give your money :)

Click images view full size:

Space and Astronomical Art Journal: Space Ark Design
Space and Astronomical Art Journal: Space Ark Design
Space and Astronomical Art Journal: Space Ark Design
Space and Astronomical Art Journal: Space Ark Design
Space and Astronomical Art Journal: Space Ark Design
Space and Astronomical Art Journal: Space Ark Design
Space and Astronomical Art Journal: Space Ark Design

Link: Presentation of Space Ark

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Dave Archer Space Art on glass

Dave Archer Space Paintings on Glass

Dave Archer Space Paintings on Glass.

In reverse glass painting, Dave Archer applies paint to the back side of the glass, which in essence makes the glass his canvas. This is a difficult process that yields effects unparalleled by other painting techniques: vibrant colors, depth of view, even a sense of movement or three dimensions. He mixes media, using a variety of paints and unconventional materials such as metallic powders, crystals, and other substances. Then he hits the mixture with his signature process, using high voltage of electricity to add nebulosity and other fantastic details to his paintings. Amazing technique!

Sources:

Dave Archer's personal website

Artist's Gallery

Dave Archer Electric Machines

Sunday, September 10, 2006

Space in the 1980s and 1990s


Illustrated history: Space Stations and Manned Spaceflight in the 1980s and 1990s

Saturday, September 09, 2006

Mark A. Garlick Space Art

Mark A. Garlick is a British freelance artist, science illustrator and writer. His art has been featured internationally in many books and popular astronomy and science magazines. Artist says: I am a professional illustrator and author, working freelance and specialising in science fiction, technology and space. I came into the profession with a scientific background, establishing my business in late 1996. Since then I have written and illustrated four of my own books, and my images have appeared in their hundreds in other books, publications and in advertising. I use mainly Photoshop, either importing elements from photos or hand-drawing from scratch with a graphics pad. I use 3D also (e.g. 3DS Max, Terragen) but sparingly. And sometimes I work in acrylic or pastels. I am a member of the Society of Authors, and an elected Fellow of the International Association of Astronomical Artists (IAAA).

Below are a few examples of his artwork (from Space.com). For more information check out the Art of Mark A. Garlick. See also his portfolio on the Mark A. Garlick Words and Pictures.

Note: All artwork and images copyright © Mark A. Garlick. Please do not use images without the permission of the artist.

Mark Garlick Space Art
Mark Garlick Space Art
Mark Garlick Space Art
Mark Garlick Space Art
Mark Garlick Space Art

Website I: The Art of Mark A. Garlick

Website II: Mark A. Garlick Words and Pictures

Friday, September 08, 2006

Space Wear from 1956

Mechanix Illustrated: Here’s What We’ll Wear in Space

What We’ll Wear in Space (Mechanix Illustrated. Jan, 1956): Designers are already working on the styles the well-dressed space man needs to survive...

Scans: What We’ll Wear in Space

Thursday, September 07, 2006

Pat Rawlings Space Art

Pat Rawlings is a very well known space artist. He has painted many scenes of human exploration on the moon, Mars, and deep space. His paintings of space scenes have been used in various studies by NASA and other organizations (Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Wyle Laboratories) and have appeared in many books. Pat Rawlings has been doing NASA art for 17 years and has become one of the most popular artists in the world of aerospace. His artworks are seen in a huge number of publications and these can also be found in collections around the world, but are most often only credited "courtesy of NASA".

Pat Rawlings creates images based on scientific and technical themes that appeal to both rocket scientists and regular folk. His extraterrestrial "snapshots" of future events give viewers a sense of "being there" as explorers hop from one world to the next using the best technology of the 21st century. Rawlings' desire to travel in space and time motivate him to make scenes as accurate as possible. After consulting with numerous space experts around the country, he uses hand-built and computer models, topographical maps, and space and family vacation photos to mentally create his worlds. "Space art", says the artist, "provides me with an excuse to talk to some of the most interesting people in the country, build minature models of space ships, and then sit in my studio painting or working on the computer for hours while listening to movie soundtracks and classical music".

Below is a selection of some of his countless artworks (from Space.com). You can click on images for a much larger version.

Note: All artwork and images copyright © Pat Rawlings. Please do not use images without the permission of the artist.

Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art
Pat Rawlings Space Art


Sourses:

Official Pat Rawlings website

Pat Rawlings and his Cosmic Canvas. August 1, 2004, by Bill Cawthon.

Pat Rawlings at Novaspace